“Even with a few adulterations, my Hungarian Goulash is the real deal... originally a campfire stew developed by Hungarian herdsman who cooked tough cuts of meat for hours over a low fire until tender. It is a simple dish calling for little more than tender braised beef, onions, and paprika. However, for my American taste, I incorporate some carrots. It is the closest recipe that I can find to the Hungarian Goulash that I loved at a wonderful, long-gone restaurant in Boston called Cafe Budapest. Be sure that the paprika you use is fresh. Great goulash is all about the meat...and the paprika. Serve the stew over egg noodles or boiled potatoes for a hearty meal.”
READY IN:
4hrs
SERVES:
6
UNITS:
US

Ingredients Nutrition

  • 1 (3 1/2 lb) boneless beef chuck-eye roast, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2- inch cubes (I prefer the chuck-eye roast, but any boneless roast from the chuck will work)
  • salt
  • 13 cup sweet paprika (I use "Pride of Szegeo" Hungarian sweet paprika... do NOT substitute hot, half-sharp, or smoked papr)
  • 1 (12 ounce) jar roasted red peppers, drained and rinsed (about 1 cup)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 3 teaspoons white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 large onions, minced (about 6 cups)
  • 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch-thick rounds (about 2 cups)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup canned low sodium beef broth, warmed
  • 14 cup sour cream (optional, I find that it adds extra richness)
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. Adjust an oven rack to the lower-middle position and preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Sprinkle the meat evenly with about 1 teaspoon salt and let stand for 15 minutes.
  2. In a food processor or blender, combine the paprika, roasted peppers, tomato paste, and 2 teaspoons of the vinegar. Process until smooth, 1 to 2 minutes, scraping down the sides as needed.
  3. Combine the oil, onions, and 1 teaspoon salt in a large Dutch oven; cover and set over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions have softened but have not yet browned, 8 to 10 minutes. (If the onions do begin to brown, reduce the heat to medium-low and stir in 1 tablespoon of water.).
  4. Stir in the paprika mixture; cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions stick to the bottom of the pan, about 2 minutes. Add the beef, carrots, and bay leaf; stir until the beef is well coated. Using a rubber spatula, scrape down the sides of the pot. Cover the pot and transfer to the oven. Cook until the meat is almost tender and the surface of the liquid is 1/2 inch below the top of the meat, 2 to 2 1/2 hours, stirring about every 30 minutes. Remove the pot from the oven and add enough heated beef broth so that the surface of the liquid is 1/4 inch from the top of the meat (the beef should NOT be fully submerged). Return the covered pot to the oven and continue cooking until a fork slips easily in and out of the beef, about 30 minutes longer.
  5. Skim the fat off the surface; stir in the remaining 1 teaspoon of vinegar and the sour cream (if using). Remove and discard the bay leaf, season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve.
  6. (The stew can be cooled, covered tightly, and refrigerated for up to 2 days. However, wait to add the optional sour cream until after reheating. Before reheating, skim the hardened fat from the surface and add enough water to the stew to thin slightly.).

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