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Negima - Beef Scallion Rolls

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“The most difficult part of making Negima is said to be slicing the meat thin enough to wrap around the scallions. Worth asking a butcher for ultra-thin cut sirloin. maybe freezing the meat a bit first would make it easier to slice at home. Possibly easier is using pork, chicken, or veal sold as thin cutlets. With a little pounding they're thin enough. From Bittman's Best Recipes in the World.”
READY IN:
35mins
SERVES:
6
UNITS:
US

Ingredients Nutrition

  • 14 cup soy sauce, plus more for brushing the meat
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar (or white wine vineagar)
  • 1 tablespoon mirin (or 2 tsp honey mixed with 2 tsp water)
  • 24 scallions, green parts only (or a big fistful of chives)
  • 1 14 lbs beef, chicken, veal or 1 14 lbs pork, sliced ultra-thin, about 3 inches wide and 5 - 6 inches long

Directions

  1. Start a charcoal or wood fire or preheat a gas grill or broiler; the fire should be quite hot.
  2. Mix together the first 3 ingredients, then soak the scallions or chives in the this mixture while you prepare the meat.
  3. Place the meat between 2 layers of wax paper or plastic wrap and pound it gently with a mallet, the bottom of a cast-iron pan, or rolling pin until it is about 1/8 inch thick. Brush one side of each piece of meat with a little soy sauce.
  4. Remove the scallions or chives from their soaking liquid and cut them into lengths about the same width as the meat. Place a small bundle of them at one of the narrow ends of each slice, on the soy-brushed side. Roll the long way, securing the roll with a toothpick or two. (You can prepare the rolls in advance up to this point; cover and refrigerate for up to 2 hours before proceeding.) Brush the exterior of the roll with a little of the soaking liquid.
  5. Grill or broil until brown on all sides, a total of about 6 minutes for chicken, 4 to 5 minutes for pork or veal, 4 minutes or less for beef.

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